german cuisine

  1. Schnitzel Breaded With Crushed Pretzels and Traditional German Potato Salad

    Schnitzel Breaded With Crushed Pretzels and Traditional German Potato Salad

    Do you know those days when you’re really craving something but you don't have all the ingredients for the dish you want? I wanted to do schnitzel which is breaded and I didn’t have any crumbs, so I looked...

    Do you know those days when you’re really craving something but you don't have all the ingredients for the dish you want? I wanted to do schnitzel which is breaded and I didn’t have any crumbs, so I looked through the cupboards to see if there was something I could use. I ended up finding pretzels, which would go perfectly with my German dish. Too bad I didn't have nacho chips, I have a funny feeling that would have been delicious too. Anyway, the original schnitzel is made with veal, but I just find it too expensive and hard to get around here. So I make it out of pork, which taste perfectly fine, when you do it right.

    We ate potatoes almost every day when I was growing up, so my mama knows all kinds of interesting ways to serve it. Cooked, mashed, fried, baked, in soup, as a dressing or a salad. The potato salad I'm gonna show you today is one of my favorites. It's very typical for Germany, but it might be new for you. Let's start cooking!!

    Schnitzel Breaded With Crushed Pretzels and Traditional German Potato Salad
    Schnitzel Breaded With Crushed Pretzels and Traditional German Potato Salad

    Schnitzel breaded with crushed pretzels

     Ingredients:

    • 4 pieces of pork (the ones who are already cut)
    • 3-4 cups of crushed pretzels
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 cup flour
    • 1 tsp peeper and salt

    Directions:

    1. Put the pretzels in a freezer bag and start crushing them up. They don't need to be extremely fine. Make sure you can still tell its pretzels.
    2. Rinse the pork under cold running water, pat dry. Put the pork in a freezer bag as well and start hammering it nice and thin. This way the meat juice doesn't fly everywhere. Take a plate and spread salt and pepper on it. Place the pork on it and season it again. This way it's faster and way easier.
    3. Pour the flour, eggs (scrambled) and the pretzel crumbs on three different plates. Dip each portion in the flour, turn it around and shake the leftover flour off. Then in the eggs, turn it around again so the meat is covered with egg. Now you dip it in the crumbs, place a little bit on top too, than turn it around and push it into the pretzels.
    4. Preheat the oven for 350 Fahrenheit and place the schnitzel on a oven pan.

    If you like it more greasy heat up a cup of oil on top of the stove on medium heat. Fry the schnitzel for about 6 minutes on each side. Until they golden. If you chose the other way, put the schnitzel in the oven turn them around after ten minutes. Heat up the oven to 380 Fahrenheit and let them bake for another 5 minutes. Until they golden and crispy.

    Potato salad

    Potato Salad
    Potato Salad

    Ingredients:

    • 6 small potatoes ( a little bit bigger than a tennis ball)
    • Two eggs
    • 1/3 cup onion
    • 1/3 cup bacon
    • ½ tbsp caraway seeds
    • 1 tbsp mustard
    • 1 cup vinegar
    • ½ cup oil
    • 2 bay leafs
    • 1 tsp salt and pepper

     Directions:

    1. Wash the potatoes and put them in a pot. Cover them with warm water, add a teaspoon of salt and a bay leaf. Boil them in the skin for about 20 minutes. When they done, take them out and let them cool down.
    2. Boil the eggs, we use them for the plating later.
    3. Start dicing up the onion and the bacon. Place a small pot on top of your stove and start frying the bacon for about 4 minutes on high heat. Add the onion and the mustard. Let it fry for another two minutes. Dump in the vinegar, oil, caraway seeds, bay leaf, salt and the pepper. Cook it for 7 minutes.
    4. Peel the potatoes and cut them in thumb thick slices. Pour your dressing over, stir it and let it sit for a while.

    Paprika dip

     Ingredients:

    • 2 tbsp mayonnaise
    • 1 tsp paprika
    • 1 tsp lemon juice
    • pinch of salt and pepper

     Directions:

    1. Put all the ingredients in a bowl, stir place it in a nice dish. Done!

    Plating

    I bought those dishes; which you can see in the picture, at the dollar store. I boiled two eggs, peeled, cut them and placed them on the inside of the glass dish. After that I added the potato salad into the dish. Decorate with herbs and tomato.

    Guten Appetit!

    Something about caraway seeds...

    Caraway Seeds
    Caraway Seeds

    The fruits, usually used whole, have a pungent, anise-like flavor and aroma that comes from essential oils, mostly carvone and limonene.Anethole, generally regarded as a minor product in the essential oil of this species, has also been found to be a major component. Caraway is used as a spice in breads, especially rye bread.

    Caraway is also used in desserts, liquors, casseroles, Indian cuisine rice dishes such as pulao and biryani, and other foods. It is also found in European cuisine. For example, it is used in British caraway seed cake, and it is frequently added to sauerkraut. The roots may be cooked as a vegetable like parsnips or carrots. Additionally, the leaves are sometimes consumed as herbs, either raw, dried, or cooked, similar to parsley.

    In Serbia, caraway is commonly sprinkled over home-made salty scones (poga?ice s kimom). It is also used to add flavor to cheeses such as bondost, pultost and havarti. Akvavit and several liqueurs are made with caraway.

    In Middle Eastern cuisine, caraway pudding is a popular dessert during Ramadan. Caraway is also added to flavor Harissa, a Maghrebian chili pepper paste. It is typically made and served in the Levant area in winter and on the occasion of having a new baby, In Aleppian, Syrian cuisine it is used to make the sweet scones named Keleacha.

    Caraway fruit oil is also used as a fragrance component in soaps, lotions, and perfumes. Caraway is also used as a breath freshener, and it has a long tradition of use in folk medicine.

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  2. Bread dumplings

    Bread dumplings

    Let me introduce you to one of my favorite starches - dumplings. They are from Europe and very popular in Germany. Dumplings are made from various basic dough’s, usually from raw or cooked potatoes, bread rolls or yeast dough...

    Let me introduce you to one of my favorite starches - dumplings. They are from Europe and very popular in Germany. Dumplings are made from various basic dough’s, usually from raw or cooked potatoes, bread rolls or yeast dough and spelt is sometimes used. You can be very creative with the dough and can use breads or rolls you have been saving in the freezer. It is your choice to make them sweet or savory. I prefer bread dumplings, they are perfect with a nice roast or a goulash. I grew up with potato dumplings, but my favorites are still the ones made out of bread. The thing is you can add all kinds of interesting ingredients; today I made mine with Kale and oven cooked bacon. The taste was just amazing. I love to play with whatever I have in the fridge and create new and wonderful recipes.

    Bread Dumplings
    Bread Dumplings

    Bread dumplings

    Makes 12 dumplings

    What you need:

    • 100 g /4 oz bacon
    • 1 red onion (medium size)
    • 1 teaspoon olive oil
    • 300 g /8 pieces of dry rolls    (Tip: I always buy the 50 percent off breads at superstore)
    • 300 ml/1 ¼ cups milk
    • 30 g /2 tablespoons butter
    • 4 medium eggs
    • 1 cup of chopped Kale
    • Salt and pepper
    • Salted water

     Directions

    1. Place the bacon on a baking sheet and put it in the oven at 350 Fahrenheit.
    2. Peel the onion and chop it finely. Heat up the oil in a frying pan and fry the onion on medium heat for about three minutes. Give it a good stir and then put it aside.
    3. Cut the bread, rolls, or whatever you bought for the dough for your dumplings, into small cubes and put it in a bowl.
    4. Check your bacon in the oven from time to time, to see if it’s crispy yet. It normally takes around 15 minutes.
    5. Heat up the milk with the butter, pour over cubed bread and stir well.
    6. Take out your bacon, pat it dry with paper towel. We do not want all the fat in the mixture. Cut it in very tiny pieces. Add the bacon and the onions to the bread mixture.
    7. Separate the egg yolk from the egg white. Dump the yolk into the mixture.
    8. Cut up the kale nice and small and add it as well. Season it with Salt and Pepper. Mix everything very well.
    9. Fill a large pot with about 1 liter of water and salt it.
    10. Turn the stove on high  and start boiling the water.
    11. Roll up 12 dumplings into balls, about the size of a golf ball, and place them on a plate covered in breadcrumbs, so they won’t stick to it. When the water starts boiling put the dumplings in the water. Make sure they are covered in the water. Turn the heat down and cook slightly until they start swimming on top of the water. I can´t say the actual time they have to cook. My teacher in culinary school said when they start to swim like a dead fish then they are ready.:)  It also always depends how big you roll them. Let’s say 15 – 20 minutes.
    12. When the dumplings are done, remove from the water with a skimming ladle and drain well.

    You can serve the dumplings with a roast (see this recipe for Sauerbraten) or goulash. When I was making them I just had some applesauce with it. I also roasted some raisins and red pepper for my topping. The next morning you can make a nice breakfast with the leftover dumplings and egg white. Just melt some butter in the pan. Cut up your dumplings in little cubes and fry them nice and golden. Add the egg white and season it with salt, pepper and some fresh basil. Now you have two in one.

    Enjoy !

    Tips:

    • Mix the ingredients very thoroughly so that they form a homogenous mass.
    • Cut out the dumplings with a spoon and shape them with your hands, which are previously moistened or lightly coated with flour.
    • Dumplings need a lot of room to cook, so a large pot is needed.
    • Test one dumpling to check whether the dough is the right consistency. If it breaks while boiling add a little bit more egg or milk to it.
    • Towards the end of the cooking time, take one dumpling out of the water and cut it open using two forks. If the inside is dry, they are ready. If it’s moist cook a little bit more.

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  3. Sauerbraten

    Sauerbraten

    Sauerbraten Let me introduce you to one of my favorite recipes, Sauerbraten. It's a German dish, which is very popular where I come from. My Mama used to make it almost every Sunday. Sauerbraten is a beef roast which...

    Sauerbraten
    Sauerbraten

    Let me introduce you to one of my favorite recipes, Sauerbraten. It's a German dish, which is very popular where I come from. My Mama used to make it almost every Sunday. Sauerbraten is a beef roast which has to be marinated for up to four days. You can buy it in Germany already prepared, but I taught myself to make it at home, because I am living in Nova Scotia now. This dish includes a few days of marinating, so maybe if you have people coming over to enjoy this beautiful dinner, you should try to finish the roast in the morning or a day before. The flavour is even better the next day anyway.

     So let's get started!

    Sauerbraten (braised beef marinated in vinegar and herbs)

     Ingredients:

    • 750 g/1 ½ lb beef  (Tip: I always buy a normal roast whatever is on sale )

    For the marinade:

    • 2 Onions
    • 1 bunch soup vegetables (carrots, turnip, celery, etc.)
    • 5 juniper berries
    • 15 peppercorns
    • 5 allspiceberries
    • 2 cloves
    • 1-2 bay leafs
    • 250 ml/1 cup wine vinegar
    • 375/1 ½ cup red wine (Tip: something cheap)
    • Salt, pepper
    • 2 tbs poil    (Tip:  I like to use bacon fat as a substitute)
    • 2 tbsp butter
    • ½ cup flour
    • Optional: 5 cloves of garlic, 1/2 cup of brown sugar

     Directions:

    1. Rinse the beef under cold water and pat it dry.
    2. Peel, wash and cut all the vegetables into cubes.
    3. Put the beef in a medium size bowl. In a separate bowl mix the veggies, spices, vinegar and the wine, make sure it is mixed very well. Put the mixture all over the meat, which has to be covered with it. Do not put any salt or pepper in the marinade. Doing this would dry out the meat.
    4. I also add about 5 cloves of pressed garlic and a half a cup of brown sugar to the marinade. I like mine to have a strong garlic taste, but you can change it based on how strong you want the flavour to be.
    5. Cover the bowl with a lid or foil, whatever is handy to you. Put it in the fridge for four days. Make sure to turn the meat around each day, so that all sides will be nice and full of flavour.
    6. Heat up a frying pan with the bacon fat.
    7. Remove the meat from the mixture and season it with salt and pepper. Don’t be shy, put a good amount on it. The best thing to do is if you put two tablespoons of each in a small bowl, stir it and rub it in to the meat.
    8. When the fat is hot enough (Tip: you can tell by using a wooden spoon, stir the fat and when it starts making little bubbles you are good to go)  fry it for 3-4 minutes on all sides.
    9. Add the marinade and cover it. Put it on medium heat and let it sit for about 30 minutes.
    10. Turn the meat around and let it braise for another 1 ½ hours. Add liquid (wine or water) if necessary.
    11. Take the meat out of the pot and put it aside.
    12. Let the juices go through a strainer and set aside. You can discard the veggies or use them for plating if you like.
    13. Now lets make the sauce. In a small pot melt some butter. Add flour and whisk it very well. Add the juice into the pot and give everything a good stir. Season it with salt and pepper.
    14. Cut the meat in very thin slices and heat it up again in the sauce, for about three minutes.

    You can serve your Sauerbraten with nice mashed potatoes, pasta or rice.

    I like to eat it with bread dumplings (see my bread dumplings recipe here) and warm red cabbage.

    You can get the German beer Erdinger here in the liquor stores, it fits perfectly the heavy taste of the food.

    Guten Appetit!

    Something about Sauerbraten...

    Sauerbraten was originally made from horse meat, but today is most often made from beef. Particularly in the Rhineland, however, there are still many restaurants offering traditional Sauerbraten from horse meat. My mother made it out of horse meat one time… she told me after I ate it. I was so angry, but it actually tasted amazing, so soft and juicy. We Germans still eat horse Salami as well. I do not know if that is a crime here, but people gave me funny looks after I told them what I was in too. Lol

    Juniper Berries
    Juniper Berries

    Something about Juniper berries...

    Juniper berries, have been found in Egypt. The berries imported into Egypt may have come from Greece; the Greeks record using juniper berries as a medicine long before mentioning their use in food. The Greeks used the berries in many of their Olympics events because of their belief that the berries increased physical stamina in athletes.

    Juniper is mostly used as a spice now, particularly in the european cuisine. It gives gin his distinctive flavor as well. The european like to use them to flavor birds, pork, beef, cabbage and sauerkraut dishes.

    I looked for them quiet a long time but finally found them at Bulk Barn.

     

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